Jocko Willink on Fear of Failure

This is my favorite video of the week, check out this awesome video from retired Navy SEAL Jocko Willink’s on Fear of Failure. Be sure to stay all the way to the end, it’s only 2.5 minutes, it’s a great message, and the delivery is fantastic. You will be ready to tackle a grizzly bear by the time the video concludes.

The Video

The Transcript

Transcript below in case you are somewhere that you cannot watch the video:

Jocko: “Fear of failure… obviously, fear of failure can keep you from taking risk. It can leave you sitting there, paralyzed, not taking any action at all and, obviously, that’s bad. But, I don’t want you to actually overcome fear of failure. I want you to be afraid of failure. Fear of failure is good. Fear of failure will keep you… up at night, planning, and rehearsing, going over contingencies. Fear of failure will keep you training hard. It will stop you from cutting corners. Fear of failure will keep you working, training, striving, and trying to be more prepared for battle. I want you to be afraid of failure. I fear failure.

But, more important – I want you to be horrified, I want you to be terrified of sitting on your ass and doing nothing. That is what I want you to be afraid of. Waking up in 6 days, 6 weeks, 6 years, or 60 years and you’re no closer to your goal, you’ve made no progress. That is the horror, that is the nightmare. That is what you need to be truly afraid of. Being stagnant.

So, get up. And go. Take the risk, take the gamble, take the first step, take action. And don’t let another day slip by.”

Still afraid to take the leap into a new venture? Check out my post on 7 Strategies to Overcoming the Fear of What Everyone Else Thinks.

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Zyrtec: Quit without itching like crazy

If you take Zyrtec (generic name – cetirizine hydrochloride) daily and have tried to stop, your skin may start to itch. Sometimes, this itching can be very intense, distracting, and can even disrupt your sleep.

After several failed attempts to stop taking Zyrtec due to itching, I found a solution that allowed me to wean off the medication with zero side effects. If I had known about this approach a long time ago, I could have saved myself a lot of misery.

The Solution

I turned to my old friend Amazon and found these 5mg cetirizine hydrochloride tablets. They are half the regular dose of 10mg Zyrtec sold in stores.

These lower dosage tablets were a breakthrough for me in finally ending daily dependence on this medication. They allowed me to slowly reduce my intake of Zyrtec, which avoided the itching withdrawal effect completely.

The Weaning Schedule

I began to wean myself down off Zyrtec by substituting the 5mg tablets for my Zyrtec tablets on a schedule like the below:

Weeks 1-2: I took a regular 10mg tablet one day, then took 5mg the next, back to 10mg the following day, 5mg the next day, and so on.

Weeks 3-4: I took 5mg everyday.

Weeks 5-6: I took 5mg one day and took no Zyrtec/cetirizine hydrochloride the next. I continued to alternate for the entire 2 weeks.

Weeks 7-8: I took 5mg one day and took no Zyrtec/cetirizine hydrochloride for the next TWO days. I continued the pattern for the whole 2 weeks.

Weeks 9 and beyond: I stopped taking Zyrtec entirely.

Want to give it a shot? You can find 5mg cetirizine hydrochloride tablets on Amazon by clicking here.

I can still take a 5 mg tablet as needed without problems. I have found in this process that the 5mg tablet is just as effective for me as the 10mg. I also can go back to taking a 5m tablet every other day during the heart of allergy season and stop again without issues.

Update: it has since been suggested to me that 10mg Zyrtec tablets could simply be cut in half rather than buying the 5mg tablets. I haven’t tried this myself, because, for me, I prefer the ease of not cutting the pills especially with how cheap the 5mg tablets are.

Disclaimer

I am not a doctor, nor do I play one on the internet. I am sharing my personal experience because I would have loved for someone to share this with me years ago. Talk with your doctor before making a change in medication, etc. and all the other usual disclaimers.

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